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Current Emergency Updates


Tips to Beat the Heat, Stay Cool in Santa Rosa (updated 6/10/19 at 11 a.m.)


The National Weather Service (NWS) is forecasting hot temperatures for the North Bay, including the City of Santa Rosa. Temperatures in Santa Rosa are expected to peak at 101 degrees this afternoon. Because temperatures dropped significantly overnight, the NWS considers today’s weather a Moderate Heat Risk event. 

Residents should be mindful of the heat and heed the following tips to stay safe:

  • Never leave children, seniors or pets in a parked car during periods of intense summer heat.
  • Drink fluids, particularly water, even if you do not feel thirsty. Your body needs water to keep cool.
  • If possible, stay out of the sun and in air-conditioned areas.
  • Mow fields in the mornings before 10AM, but never when it’s windy or excessively dry. Lawn mowers are designed to mow lawns, not weeds or dry grass. Metal blades striking rocks can create sparks and start fires.

Current weather conditions do not meet the City’s established thresholds to activate an official cooling center, however, the City reminds residents that Recreation & Parks operates several air-conditioned lobbies that are open to the public if citizens need a place to stay cool during the day, including:

  • Finley Community Center - 2060 West College Avenue - 8AM-6PM, M-F & Sat 9AM-11AM
  • Person Senior Wing – 2060 West College Ave – 8AM-5PM, M-F Bring books, games and/or laptops and headphones. Free WiFi is available. There is no TV available.
  • Steele Lane Community Center - 415 Steele Lane - 8:00AM-5PM, M-F

The City’s two public pools are also open for recreational swimming with associated fees, including:

  • Finley Aquatic Center - 2060 West College Avenue - 1:30-4:45PM M-F and Sat & Sun 1:30-6PM
  • Ridgway Swim Center -   455 Ridgway Avenue - 1:15-4PM M-F, 7:30-9:30PM F and Sat & Sun 1:15-6PM
  • Fees: $4.50 Adult / Youth, Senior, Disabled: $3.50


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*FIRST RED FLAG WARNING OF THE SEASON* 
(ISSUED FOR HIGHER ELEVATIONS OF SONOMA COUNTY)
Per the US National Weather Service San Francisco Bay Area/Monterey California, the Red Flag Warning will be in effect tonight (Friday 6/7) through Sunday (6/9) afternoon for the North Bay Hills.
A wind event will begin tonight across the North Bay hills with wind gusts from 40 to 50 mph over the highest peaks. Temperatures on Saturday will warm into the 90s followed by another round of winds Saturday night along with little or no humidity recovery creating critical fire weather conditions. Although fuels are not at critical levels a weather event of this magnitude will allow fire to carry through finer fuels such as grass. Winds will ease on Sunday but temperatures will soar into the 90s to near 100 degrees with continued light offshore winds.
* AFFECTED AREA...The North Bay Hills above 1000 feet.
* WIND...Northeast winds 15 to 25 mph with gusts 40 to 50 mph. Strongest winds early Saturday morning and then again Saturday 
night. Local gusts to 60 mph possible.
* HUMIDITY...Initially moderate 40-50% Friday night but lowering 12-22% Saturday with little or no humidity recovery Saturday night. Values to 10% by Sunday afternoon.
* HIGHEST THREAT...is located along the hills of eastern Napa county and around Mt Saint Helena.
* IMPACTS...any grass fires that develop will likely spread rapidly. Outdoor burning is not recommended.

*FIRST RED FLAG WARNING OF THE SEASON* 
(ISSUED FOR HIGHER ELEVATIONS OF SONOMA COUNTY)
Per the US National Weather Service San Francisco Bay Area/Monterey California, the Red Flag Warning will be in effect tonight (Friday 6/7) through Sunday (6/9) afternoon for the North Bay Hills.
A wind event will begin tonight across the North Bay hills with wind gusts from 40 to 50 mph over the highest peaks. Temperatures on Saturday will warm into the 90s followed by another round of winds Saturday night along with little or no humidity recovery creating critical fire weather conditions. Although fuels are not at critical levels a weather event of this magnitude will allow fire to carry through finer fuels such as grass. Winds will ease on Sunday but temperatures will soar into the 90s to near 100 degrees with continued light offshore winds.
* AFFECTED AREA...The North Bay Hills above 1000 feet.
* WIND...Northeast winds 15 to 25 mph with gusts 40 to 50 mph. Strongest winds early Saturday morning and then again Saturday 
night. Local gusts to 60 mph possible.
* HUMIDITY...Initially moderate 40-50% Friday night but lowering 12-22% Saturday with little or no humidity recovery Saturday night. Values to 10% by Sunday afternoon.
* HIGHEST THREAT...is located along the hills of eastern Napa county and around Mt Saint Helena.
* IMPACTS...any grass fires that develop will likely spread rapidly. Outdoor burning is not recommended.

Emergency Preparedness Information

Know Your Alerts

The City of Santa Rosa uses multiple notification and warning systems to make sure emergency alerts are delivered to the people who need the information. Download the City's alerts and warnings flyer to review these systems.  English  |  Spanish

What You Need to know about Red Flag Warnings

A Red Flag Warning means that there is an increased risk for fire danger due to warm temperatures, very low humidity and stronger winds. Avoid outdoor activities that could strike a fire during a Red Flag Warning.

  1. Never mow or trim dry grass during a red flag warning because a power tool could spark on a rock and start a grass fire. It is not recommended even on windy, dry, hot days.
  2. Thoroughly extinguish all cigarettes and smoking material.
  3. Don’t pull your vehicle over in grass as it can spark a grass fire. If necessary, pull over on paved roads.
  4. Use spark arrestors on portable gasoline powered equipment to avoid an accidental fire.
  5. Properly maintain vehicles to prevent starting fires along roads due to sparks or flammable materials being spit out from the catalytic converter system.
  6. Ensure trailer chains don’t drag on the ground and spark.

What to do to prepare your family and your property for fire season:

  • There are steps that homeowners can take in the immediate area around their home to reduce the risk and spread of wildfire. Proper vegetation management around the home, most commonly referred to as defensible space, is the space between a structure and the wildland area that creates a buffer to slow or halt the spread of fire to a structure. It protects the home from igniting due to direct flame or radiant heat. Defensible space is essential to help protect a structure during a wildland fire. Create defensible space by removing weeds, brush, and other vegetation from around your property. Harden your home by inspecting roofs, eaves, vents, walls and fencing, windows and doors, and balconies and decks for areas that fire embers could potentially enter your home and catch fire.
  • Home hardening is another technique residents should use to help protect their home and reduce the spread of fire. If embers from a wildland fire can find a weak spot in your home’s fire protection scheme, your home may easily catch fire because of small, overlooked, or seemingly inconsequential factors.
  • Keep your cell phone turned on at all times to receive emergency alerts
  • Sign up to receive emergency notifications at SoCoAlert.com. SoCoAlert will be used to send an emergency notification if there is an imminent threat to life or property. 
  • Have an evacuation and family emergency plan ready.
  • The following resources offer additional guidance:


Rain Ready Information for Wet Weather Season

National Weather Service Warning System:

  • The National Weather Service issues weather advisories and watches when the weather forecast indicates there is a potential for hazardous conditions. Watches and advisories are shared online at https://www.weather.gov/alerts, and on the National Weather Service social media Facebook and Twitter feeds.

Sign up for Sonoma County Emergency Alerts:

  • Sign up to receive emergency notifications at SoCoAlert.com. SoCoAlert will be used to send an emergency notification if there is an imminent threat to life or property.

Weather Emergency Radios

  • In areas where there is limited cell service, or if a power outage occurs, Emergency Warnings from the National Weather Service will be announced on the Weather Emergency Radios, which rely on batteries.

Emergency public hotlines - Flood, sanitation, streams maintenance

Flood Forecast Hotline: (707) 526-4768

The Flood Forecast is a recording that provides updates on local river conditions. The recordings are updated by the Sonoma County Water Agency as conditions change.

Stream Maintenance: (707) 521-1845

Report any stream related issues, such as debris or stream channel changes, to prevent localized flooding.

Sand and Sandbags Available for City Residents to Control Rain-Run-off on Properties

Each year, the City's Sandbag Station is available to residents throughout the rainy season. If you need to control rain run-off on your property, sand and bags are available for City residents at the City Municipal Services Center at 55 Stony Point Road. The yard is open 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. Materials are available throughout the entire rain season, not only during storm events. Simply by showing your ID to verify your City of Santa Rosa address, City residents can drive into the Municipal Services Center Yard and access the sandbag filling station. There is no charge for City residents to utilize the Sandbag Station.  Shovels will be on hand for residents to fill bags with sand. Residents should plan to transport the sandbags in a vehicle they don't mind getting dirty and should note that the sand has been stored outdoors so the sandbags may be heavy and muddy to transport.
Questions? Contact 707-543-3800 M-F 8am-5pm, or 707-543-3805 on weekends and after-hours.

Important Rain-Ready Information for Property Owners Whose Properties are Located Within or Around the Wildfire Burn Scar Area

A multi-agency analysis of the 2017 wildfire damage found that properties located within fire burn areas may still be at risk for flash floods, mudflows and debris flows. To familiarize yourself with the potential hazards associated with the burned areas please view the Post-Fire Hazard Assessment Map. Residents who live in areas identified as at medium and high-risk of flash flooding, debris and mud flows  were mailed information that can be seen here

What Property Owners Can Do To Be Prepared

The National Weather Service expects debris flows to become more likely during periods of intense rainfall. Be prepared by:

  • Identifying vulnerable areas on your property.
  • Using erosion control techniques, such as installing wattles and rock bags, and clearing fire-related debris from creeks and drainages to reduce flooding.
  • Have an evacuation and emergency plan ready.
  • Keep your cell phone turned on at all times to receive emergency alerts.

Stay Informed

  • Sonoma Water has installed rainfall and stream gauges in watersheds in burned areas and is working to install radar equipment to improve early warning forecasts for residents in high-risk areas. Use this link for real-time data: www.sonoma.onerain.com

National Weather Service Warning System:

  • The National Weather Service issues weather advisories and watches when the weather forecast indicates there is a potential for hazardous conditions. Watches and advisories are shared online at https://www.weather.gov/alerts, and on the National Weather Service social media Facebook and Twitter feeds.
  • Warning: The National Weather Service will issue a Warning if hazardous conditions are imminent or occurring within the burn areas.
  • The National Weather Service sends Warnings over the Wireless Emergency Alerts system that will send a message to all cell phones in the burn areas and will also send out alerts through the Emergency Alert System that broadcasts on radios and televisions.

Visit sonomacountyrecovers.org/rain-ready, for additional property owner resources and information on preparing for rainy weather in fire-impacted areas.

Power Outages

  1. Preparing for a Power Outage
  2. What to Do Once the Power Goes Out
Preparing for a Power Outage
  • Build or restock your emergency supply kit. Stock supplies to last a week, including flashlights, fresh batteries, first aid supplies and cash.
  • Plan for any medical needs for you and your family. 
  • Talk with your doctor about planning for any medications that may need to be refrigerated or medical devices that require power.
  • Store emergency water and food in portable containers. 
  • Have enough water and food to last a week. Store in portable, waterproof containers in an easy-to-reach location.
  • Identify backup charging methods for phones. Consider alternative charging methods such as portable battery packs for phones and other devices that require power.
  • Create and practice an emergency plan. Make sure everyone in your home knows what to do by practicing your emergency plan several times.Print and store an emergency contact list outside of your phone. In the event your phone battery dies, make sure every member of your family has a copy of important phone numbers.
  • Evaluate your home. Install and replace batteries in smoke alarms, and locate and know how to use fire extinguishers.
  • Know how to open your garage door manually. Learn and practice opening your garage door using the manual release lever.
  • Keep your gas tank full or your car charged. Gas stations rely on electricity to pump gas, so try to keep your gas tank full in case of an outage. If you have an electric vehicle, keep it charged.
  • Keep ice on hand to keep food cold. Freeze water in plastic jugs so you can use them to keep food cold during a temporary outage.
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Important Information in the Event of an Emergency

  1. What You Can Do on Your Own
  2. During an Emergency
  3. Evacuation
  4. Sheltering
  5. Transportation
  6. Hospitals
  7. Fire Stations
  8. Local Resources
  9. Non-Emergency Numbers

What You Can Do on Your Own

Guides & Resources for Emergency Preparation